Four Star Review from Theatre WeeklyHarry Blake’s delightfully silly romp Thor and Loki is the kind of comedy musical that will always fare well at the Edinburgh Fringe.  There’s a good chance you already know quite a bit about the Norse Gods thanks to the wildly successful Marvel franchises, but you’ve probably never seen them like this before.

The mighty Thor, played by Blake himself, isn’t so tough in this particular version.  If anything, he’s a little wet, content with writing poetry and hiding Greek pottery under his bed.  Odin (Bob Harm) is not best pleased having spent a small fortune on an enchanted hammer so that his son can protect the apple tree of immortality. Alice Keedwell, who has co-created Thor and Loki plays Loki, the gentle giant who is also trying to promote a more peaceful existence.

It’s all very camp and jolly good fun.  The cast of five have to work hard, playing a variety of characters between them, Laurie Jamieson has the most shoes to fill and he bounds around in tight lycra shorts with carefree abandon.  As well as the role shifting, each of the cast contribute to the soundtrack being played live on stage.

You’ve probably guessed by now that this isn’t anything like those Marvel versions, but that’s not a bad thing.  It feels fresh and creative and the score is particularly strong in places, of course there’s a song about building a wall, but the nice mix of pop, rock and opera provides a varied soundscape that is more than enjoyable to listen to.

The set may be a little shaky and the costumes questionable, but there’s definite promise within the score, and Alice Keedwell’s vocal performance is extraordinary.  Thor and Loki probably won’t be Harry Blake’s defining work but it shows considerable promise for the future.

Summary
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Thor and Loki at Assembly Roxy
Author Rating
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Greg is an award-winning writer with a huge passion for theatre. He has appeared on stage, as well as having directed several plays in his native Scotland. Greg is the founder and editor of Theatre Weekly

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